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Scrutiny
  
Brake-ing trucks
With checkpoint every 50 kms
15/11/2007

Despite having 65,536 kms of national highways and incessant improvement in road networks, Indian cargo trucks still have to toil hard to reach their destinations on time.

Trucks in India still spend their 60% of transport time idling at multiple checkpoint and convincing corrupt officials about their cargos’ authenticity. These checkpoints have not only become nuisance for drivers but an easy way for many officials to make fast bucks in short time. Sample this: a cargo truck running from Delhi to Chennai, covering 2,310 kms, should complete the trip in 2.7 days but takes minimum of 10 days experiencing somewhere about 73 checkpoints. These checkpoints not only stretches the transportation time but also add to cost of transport in terms of fuel cost, maintenance cost, driver’s salary and other variable costs and penalties charged by the clients. Not just this. It decreases vehicle utilisation rate to just 6,000 kms per vehicle leading to reduced profits. In an era where time is money coupled with decreasing cost of railway cargo services, road transportation hardly has any option left but to scrap all its archaic ways of functioning in order to survive, if not compete with a fast reforming railways. It’s now do or die. As a nation too, it is important for us to realise that when a truck passes from one state to another, it still remains within the country. So does it make sense to make them halt as if they are entering a new nation? When shall we start behaving as one? Think...

By:- B&E
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